The Historic Stein Home at 853 Vienna Avenue in Niles Ohio

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Stein Family in front of home, ca 1905
Stein Family in front of home, ca 1905

Stein Residence (2016)
Stein Residence (2016)

Right back of residence
Right back of residence

Left back of residence
Left back of residence

View of front entrance
View of front entrance

Prominent Residents of the Oldest House in Niles.
A prominent Youngstown businessman, C.H. Andrews, owned the property and also purchased the Heaton Grist Mill. He was best known for being the founder of “Republic Steel” in Youngstown but owned most of the banks as well all the coal and iron bearing property in the Mahoning Valley.

Heaton
The property was originally owned by James Heaton, founder of Niles. It was transferred to his son Lewis Heaton in 1823, the year Lewis married his wife Mille Anne. The Heaton’s ran a working farm on the 110 acre property. Lewis died in 1842 and Mille Anne not long after in 1853.

Stein
Joseph and Frederica Stein, immigrants from Prussia Germany, moved to Niles in the mid 1800’s with their 5 children. Joseph was a volunteer in the army and Fredericka, along with her 5 children, ran the property as a working animal farm as well as the area's “ice business”.

The story of Jacob and Carolyn Fredericka Hacker Stein by Lucille Stein Perry, found in the Trumbull County Library’s Genealogy Center, references that the home was part of the underground railroad. She wrote: “Years ago there was what was called the Underground Railroad where people helped southern slaves get to the North. In this house, in the back part of the cellar was a part of this underground railroad”

The Steins are also know for the famous “Stein Brothers”, Herb and Russ who were part of the “Pottsville Maroons” the contested rightful winners of the first NFL championship of 1925. (Reference: The Breaker Boys – book telling of the amazing story).
Russ and Herb Stein were sons of Frederick David Stein and Nancy Eaton Troxel Stein. It was their maternal great grandfather, Daniel Heaton who built the first iron furnace in the Western Reserve. Russ was born in 1896 and two years later, Herb was born.

During the early 1900’s Cherry and Lafayette Streets ended in a pasture of Frank Stein’s farm. Their home was located on Vienna Avenue. Frank Stein was a farmer and a hard task master. He demanded work be completed before fun began and it was told that in order for the boys to play on the football team, they first had to get the crops in from the fields and do their chores. One time the whole football team had to go help get the crops in so that the Stein brothers could play in the game. They were both strong and competitive players and loved the game.

Following the passing of Frederica Stein in 1912, all but the current plot on which the home currently resides was seized by the President for the purpose of war housing in 1918 (In support of World War I).

The current home and property was donated by the surviving Stein family to the First Presbyterian Church of Howland from which it was then purchased by the Crawford Family in 1965.

Crawford/Delo

Samuel Roy Crawford and Mark Delo, residents from 1965-2006 are responsible for the wonderful renovation, and modernizing of the home. They took great care to ensure that no historical aspects of the home were compromised. They ran an antique business and Samuel (Roy) was known to have a wonderful collection of real silver Christmas ornaments which were displayed in a tree in every room of the home.

Architectural Significance
The home has been researched through the Trumbull County Archives and is documented and recorded in the Ohio Historic Inventory by the Ohio Historic Preservation Office/Ohio Historical Center. Tax reveal and increase in property taxes between 1815 and 1823 which would indicate that a structure was added to the property.

The house style is known as a Federal Colonial and is constructed of solid double brick with sandstone foundation 4-5 ft. in thickness. The masonry is done in what is called a 5 over 1 double brick lay, where you will see 5 rows of brick laid one way, and then one in the opposite direction. The eaves are laid diagonally in a saw tooth (dental) pattern.

The Federal Colonial style is known for its symmetrical architecture. The home is identified by its grand entry foyer, four rooms stacked symmetrically, and its 11 foot ceilings. Also by its 6/6 windows, cut stone sills and lintels. The entry has sidelights and arched transom with paneled reveals. Upstairs center window is tripartite with covered transom. And original “L” extends to the east.

The home remains with its original woodwork and wood panel flooring. It was indicated that any flooring used for renovation came from the home of James Heaton also known as the Heaton Mason home which was torn down in 1960’s. It was known as the sister home to the current Hall residence.


Dining Room
Dining Room
Dining Room
Dining Room
Dining Room
Dining Room

Dining Room
Dining Room
Dining Room
Dining Room
Close-up of dining room window woodwork
Close-up of dining room window woodwork

Passageway from dining room into foyer
Passageway from dining room into foyer
Front door interior
Front door interior
Close-up of original front door bolt
Close-up of original front door bolt

Staircase
Staircase

Detail of bannister rail
Detail of bannister rail

View of stairway landing and window
View of stairway landing and window


Formal living room
Formal living room
Formal living room
Formal living room
Formal living room
Formal living room

Formal living room
Formal living room
Detail of original wooden floors on first floor
Detail of original wooden floors on first floor
Stairway landing and window
Stairway landing and window

Upstairs center window is
Upstairs center window is
tripartite with covered transom

Upstairs landing
Upstairs landing

Stairway wall mural
Stairway wall mural


Bedroom (left)
Bedroom (left)
Bedroom (left)
Bedroom (left)
Bedroom (right)
Bedroom (right)

Bedroom (right)
Bedroom (right)
Bedroom (right)
Bedroom (right)

Bedroom (right)
Bedroom (right)


Bedroom (right)
Bedroom (right)

Women's shoes, ca 1900
Women's shoes, ca 1900


Detail bedroom window trim


Original wooden floors on second floor
Original wooden floors on second floor
Original millstone
Original millstone
Original stepping stone used to enter wagonsOriginal stepping stone used to enter wagons

Carolyn Fredericka Hacker Stein
Carolyn Fredericka Hacker Stein
The Story of Jacob and Carolyn Fredericka Hacker Stein by Lucille Stein Perry

Jacob Stein, born September 8, 1836 in Herchnurg, Germany which is now part of Poland today, came to the United States when a young man (His confirmation paper was dated March 12, 1850 in Germany).

The Hacker family sailed from Germany on a sailboat which took eight months on the water. Father Hacker and one sister died of cholera and were buried at sea in 1853. Daughters Carolyn (June 7, 1840-March 30, 1913) and Carrie stayed in Cleveland, Ohio while Mother and sister returned to Germany. Carrie Hacker married Homer F. Abbott January 30, 1868. Homer was from Cuyahoga County and a native of Germany. Carolyn Fredericka Hacker married Jacob Stein May 13, 1859 in Youngstown, Ohio.

Jacob and Carolyn lived at Crab Creek in Youngstown, Ohio where most of their children were born. Jacob, Sr. enlisted in the 105th Regiment of the Ohio Volunteers from 1861 to 1864. The Stein family later moved to Niles, Ohio in a large brick home on Vienna Avenue, below the intersection of now Washington and Vienna Avenue. Years ago there was what was called “an underground railroad” where people helped slaves get to the North. In this house in the back part of the cellar was a part of the underground railroad stops.

Jacob, Sr. died in 1887 not long after they had moved to Niles in 1886 and the older boys had to work to help support their mother and family. They were engaged in different trades and at one time they maintained an ice house and sold ice in Niles. Later the farm land on Vienna Avenue was taken by the U.S. Government during the First World War to build houses, which are still standing, for war-time factory workers.

Mother Carolyn Stein always kept wine barrels in the cellar and would occasionally check to see if anyone was taking her wine. Joe Sutter, who was a hired hand and did odd jobs around the house, drilled a hole in the back of the barrel where she couldn’t see it…Needless to say he was in trouble when she went to check and the barrel was empty.

Mother Carolyn Fredericka Stein died in 1912. Of this marriage between Jacob and Carolyn were born eleven children:
Elizabeth; born April 27, 1860; married Henry Rider, August 29, 1889; died April 5, 1946.
Carolyn; born October, 15, 1861; married August Daniel Fighler; died February 17, 1905.
Frank Jacob; born October 30, 1864; married Minnie Myrtle Bricker December 18, 1894; died December 6, 1946.
Jacob; born February 15, 1866; died September 27, 1878.
Frederick David; born April 15, 1869; married Nancy Eaton Troxel March 1, 1895; died March 29, 1952.
Peter Paul; born June 29, 1871; Married Evelyn Williams December 24, 1896; died April 2, 1942.
Christian F.; born August 21, 1873; died ?
George Alexander; born November 27, 1875; married Edith Williams April 11, 1906; died December 19, 1955.


 
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